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Edwin J. Drury

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Harold “Chip” Albert Hutt

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Village Trustees considering permits for new Wassail attractions

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The heart of Barnard beats on

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Betty Jane Harris

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DHART helicopter dispatched to Woodstock car crash site

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Boys Soccer wins again

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Woodstock Field Hockey shuts out Springfield

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Music icon Rosanne Cash brings her artful subversion to LOH Nov. 12

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Woodstock Emergency Services building nearing end of ‘Phase 1’

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News

Village Trustees considering permits for new Wassail attractions

Woodstock

Woodstock Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Beth Finlayson brought two permits to the Board of Trustees of Woodstock Village on Tuesday night. The permits both ask for new additions to the traditional Wassail Weekend festivities. The first was to use Middle Bridge for a Christmas market on Dec. 11. According to Finlayson, the permit had been approved for last year’s Wassail, but the event was cancelled due to pandemic concerns. The proposed market would close the bridge at 8 a.m. and open it again at 5 p.m., with the market being open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. “It would be in addition to all the other fabulous things we have going on that weekend,” said Finlayson. The second permit requested setting up five fire pits throughout the village on Dec. 11, 12, 18, and 19. The pits would be accompanied by a s’mores station where customers can purchase all the fixings. “We get calls weekly from people wanting, and I quote, ‘The Hallmark Christmas,’” said Finlayson.

Read more in the October 14 edition of the Vermont Standard.

DHART helicopter dispatched to Woodstock car crash site

Woodstock

At approximately 9 a.m. Thursday morning, Woodstock Police Department was dispatched to 4374 West Woodstock Rd in the Town of Woodstock for a reported two-car motor vehicle crash with entrapment and injury. Woodstock Fire and EMS also responded.

On arrival, officers located a 1998 white Toyota Corolla in a position of uncontrolled rest perpendicular to the travel lane. Officers located a 2020 Ford F-350 with a trailer in a position of controlled rest facing west in the shoulder of the east-bound lane. The operator of the Ford F-350 was uninjured and provided a statement at the scene.

The operator of the Toyota Corolla was injured and was extricated from his vehicle by Woodstock Fire Department. He was transported to Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center by DHART helicopter.

Witness statements and physical evidence show that the Toyota Corolla pulled out from 4374 West Woodstock Rd into traffic and was struck by the Ford F-350. The investigation is ongoing but preliminary findings are that the Toyota Corolla is at fault in this crash.

Read more in the October 21 edition of the Vermont Standard.

Woodstock Emergency Services building nearing end of ‘Phase 1’

Woodstock

The Emergency Services building in Woodstock is nearly finished with “Phase 1” of renovation efforts, according to Fire Chief David Green. “They hope to have us in the addition — which is called Phase 1 — sometime after Thanksgiving, but before the first of the year,” says Green. He says that all departments (police, fire and EMS) will move into the new addition while the construction crew goes to work on renovating the original building, adding, “That’s only a two month long renovation. The whole project is scheduled to be completed in March.” The building was built in the mid-40s, originally as a Shell gas station. It’s been an EMS station since 1975. Other renovations came later — adding two wings when the police department moved in; and, finally, in the early 90s there was a renovation with a small bay added out back. “But nothing’s been done since,” says Green.

Currently, EMS serves five other towns outside of Woodstock, but Green says there’s hopes in the future to extend their reach, adding, “Now we’ll be able to with the space and the building and the sleeping quarters. We’ll be able to accommodate more people on shift. And maybe in the future, there’ll be more towns.” The building has been under construction since mid-April, but the progress made is immense. Green makes a point to note that the project was overwhelmingly approved by Town Meeting. “Once people took a walk through, they were like, ‘Oh my God, you need this,’” says Green.  

Read more in the October 14 edition of the Vermont Standard.

Schools return to a ‘fragile’ normal

Woodstock

Local educators, students, families continue to navigate the uncharted waters of the pandemic

It has been 19 months since the initial societal lockdown at the outset of the global coronavirus pandemic. Few institutions, save for hospitals and healthcare facilities, have been more dramatically impacted by COVID-19 than our schools. Here in the Upper Valley, school administrators, teachers, students, and families continue to sail through uncharted waters, navigating a seemingly endless stream of academic, developmental, and emotional challenges.

“Trauma has almost been redefined because there is some level of trauma for everybody,” said Brittany Preston, the COVID recovery coordinator for the Windsor Southeast Supervisory Union (WSESU) and previously the assistant principal at Hartland Elementary School through much of the pandemic’s early stages. “This is an experience that no one has had before and everyone has experienced it at a different level and different pace, depending upon their own past experiences and ability to cope.”

Perhaps surprisingly to many parents and the public, administrators and educators throughout the Upper Valley region report that the impacts of COVID protocols, guidelines, and restrictions have been less on academic performance and more on the social and emotional development of area youths.

Read more in the October 14 edition of the Vermont Standard.

Features

The heart of Barnard beats on

Barnard

Our area is known for its general stores and the history, products, and people that comprise them. In this series, The Vermont Standard explores what makes each store unique.

There can be little doubt that the Barnard General Store is a sacred institution to the residents it serves. If ever there was, one need only look at the store’s closure in 2012 — and the fact that the residents themselves took up the coffee pot and stood behind the sandwich counter for several hours every day, raising the funds to bring the store back to full-time operation. Within a year’s time, the community’s fundraising efforts — which included benefit concerts and theatrical performances — were successful. $500,000 was raised, the store was purchased outright, and Joe and Jillian Minerva ushered in a new era of ownership at the BGS.

Only 27 and 24 respectively at the time, the young couple had some idea of what they were getting into — they’d been operators of grocery stores in the past, but were eager to take ownership of their own establishment. Of course, they had expected that establishment to be in Richford. 

“Our old boss gave us the idea,” said Jilian, when I asked her what inspired her to take over the BGS. “I think he knew we were supposed to be entrepreneurs and meant to be working for ourselves. He owned several supermarkets at the time and was approached about starting another one in Richford. It was too far away from his other stores, but he thought it was a good opportunity [for us].” But the store in Richford was not to be. 

“The deal unexpectedly fell through at the very last minute,” said Jillian. “We were devastated. But that very same day, we were told about the BGS. We went to visit it a week later, and the second we pulled around the bend on Route 12, saw the view of the store and the lake in the distance, we knew why the deal on the other store fell through — this was where we were supposed to be.”

Read more in the October 14 edition of the Vermont Standard.

Music icon Rosanne Cash brings her artful subversion to LOH Nov. 12

When country and folk music icon Rosanne Cash accepted the prestigious Edward MacDowell Medal for the Arts in Peterborough, N.H two months ago, it was with all the grace, wit, humility, and deeply imbued humanity that have suffused the singer-songwriter’s work for the past 40 years.

“Artists are in a service industry — the premier service industry for the heart and soul,” Cash said in her acceptance speech before 150 invited guests at the renowned MacDowell arts studios in early August. “We are bound by an imperative to create, connect, reveal, and to practice artful subversion.”

Rosanne Cash will bring her revelatory songs and artful lyrics of subversion to the Lebanon Opera House on Friday, Nov. 12, at 7:30 p.m. The concert will be the fourth in a two-part, 23-city tour that kicks off in New London, Conn. on Nov. 5 and concludes in North Carolina early in April 2022. It is Cash’s first tour since the pandemic struck. The four-time Grammy Award winner and writer of nearly two dozen Top 40 hits is looking toward the return to live performance with both trepidation and deep appreciation for the opportunity to spread her messages of healing, hope, reconciliation, and renewal to both nurture and challenge listeners in these deeply troubled times.

Read more in the October 14 edition of the Vermont Standard.

Sports

Boys Soccer wins again

Woodstock

Boys Soccer wins again

In Saturday’s Oct. 9 match against Otter Valley, a Body Wood double sealed the game for Woodstock playing on their home field. After a quiet first half, the game exploded into life midway through the second. Wood scored his first following good work by Abas, slotting a shot just inside the right-hand post from the left of the penalty box. In similar fashion Wood’s second came from a McKenna pull back. Michael LaCroix made sure of a win with a couple of key saves to keep Woodstock on top. 

Read more in the October 14 edition of the Vermont Standard.

Woodstock Field Hockey shuts out Springfield

Woodstock

In their Saturday Oct. 9 home game, Woodstock beat Springfield by a score of 5-0. The Wasps started the scoring early with a goal from Claudia Shoemaker unassisted 4 minutes into the game on a beautiful flick. A few minutes later, Sophie Yates got her first of two goals on a corner shot with an assist from Norah Harper. Gabby Hazen scored her first goal of the season in the third quarter to make it 3-0. Lily Gubbins scored in the 4th quarter to add to the Woodstock scoring. Zada Grant had 13 saves against Springfield.

Read more in the October 14 edition of the Vermont Standard.

Obituaries

Edwin J. Drury

Edwin J. Drury — 11/09/1937 – 10/07/2021

Ed completed his last flight in the early morning of October 7th.  Ed was born and raised in Woodstock, Vermont.  He graduated from Woodstock Union High School, where he participated in football and was a ski patrol member.  Upon graduating from high school, he volunteered with the United States Air Force that became his career for 22 years.  He was a flight engineer for C130 aircraft, serving in the Vietnam War, Panama crisis, and the Cuban crisis. As a decorated war veteran, one of his defining moments was his presence during the release of the POWs at the end of the Vietnam War.  He and his squadron had the honor of flying many of the POWs home.

Ed was a kind and generous man to his family, friends, and fellow airmen.  When Ed retired, bowling became his passion.  Ed will be missed by his wife of 62 years, Linda; son, Bryan; daughter, Traci; grandchildren, Bryce, Corey, and Zachary; great-grandchildren, Mabel, Mila, and Maxwell; and his best friend, Jake.

Donations to your favorite charity may be made in Ed’s honor.

Ed will be laid to rest with full military honors at Tahoma National Cemetery, Kent, WA, on October 27th at 1 p.m. All are welcome.

MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.

Harold “Chip” Albert Hutt

Hartland

Harold “Chip” Albert Hutt, passed away peacefully in the afternoon of Tuesday, October 12th, at the age of 53. Chip’s last days were quiet, song-filled, and restful as he moved toward the next life, ending his battle with cancer after years of fighting with unimaginable strength. His dearest friends, Dorcy and Brian Isenor, provided a home and care for Chip in his last months. They created a space filled with palpable, deep love, and the opportunity for countless visitors to spend time with Chip before he passed.

Chip was born on March 5th, 1968. He was raised by the wind and his loving parents Roberta and Paul Hutt. Through his child and young adulthood, Chip was known for his energy and charm. Class president, captain of the basketball team, ladies man… a social butterfly. Chip thrived off sharing his heart and welcoming others to do the same. With the ability to carry any conversation, offer endless support, and dance like no other, Chip was constantly surrounded by friendship.

Chip married his late wife Patience at the age of 23 and they later had four children. Patience and Chip devoted themselves to being wonderful parents. Together, they taught their family to love the earth and its people and, above all, to always be kind. They both cared deeply for nature, all animals, and green tea with honey on chilly mornings. Harold spent their twenty years of marriage working in tree service and carpentry, teaching karate, and spending most of his free time outdoors.

Over the past years, Chip had the opportunity to fulfill his dream of traveling the world, found precious new love with his partner Lindsey, and experienced the beauty of being a grandfather. He was incredibly proud of his family.

Chip’s strength, courage, and unshakable joy throughout the immense challenges he faced could only have been fueled by his passion and gratitude for life and love. In his words, it’s all good.

Chip is preceded in death by his wife Patience, sister Robin, and brother Steven. He is survived by his parents Paul and Roberta Hutt, his sister Lisa Olmstead, brother Marty Hutt, his children Sierra, Hunter, Trakker, and Daisy Hutt, his grandchildren Lily, Addison and Milo, his partner Lindsey and many beloved cousins and relatives.

The graveside service will be held at 1 p.m. on October 23rd at Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Bridgewater, VT.  A celebration of life will follow at the Grange Hall in Bridgewater, VT at 2 p.m.

Contributions in memory of Chip can be made to the Go Fund Me or sent directly to Sierra Hutt for assistance in funeral and burial costs.

An online guestbook can be found at cabotfh.com

Betty Jane Harris

Betty Jane Harris died peacefully in her sleep on October 4th at the Terrace in Woodstock, Vt.  She was born in Cavendish, Vermont, and was the daughter of Raymond and Doris Frechette of Bridgewater.  She was the oldest of seven children.  She is predeceased by her parents, her husband William (Bill) Harris, a brother David Frechette and two sisters, Joan Rochford and Kay West Rose.

She graduated from Sheldon Beauty Academy in Burlington Vermont.  After graduating she went to work for Jerry’s Salon in Woodstock and then went to work for Hilde’s in Hanover where she retired.

Betty liked skiing, dancing, knitting, sewing, and music.  She and her husband spent the winters in Florida for many years where they liked to travel.

She was an active member of the American Legion, VFW Woman’s Auxiliary, and the Emblem Club.  She was president of the Emblem Club for several years and held various officer positions in the other organizations.

She is survived by her three children, Elisabeth Hill of Bridgewater, Vt, Ronald Harris of Sarasota, Fl. and Claudia Townsend of Richardson, TX.  Her brother Charles Frechette of White River, Vt, Barbara Leonard of Woodstock, Vt, and Sharon Carlotto of Morristown NJ.  Betty has six grandchildren, ten great-grandchildren, and eight great-great-grandchildren

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the American Foundation for the Blind.  A private funeral service will be held at Riverside Cemetery.

An online guest book can be found at cabotfh.com

Sandra Kay Thompson

Sandra Kay Thompson, 74, passed away Thursday, July 29, 2021.   Sandy was born September 22, 1946 to Robert E Thompson and Mary (Cline) Thompson.   She grew up in Indianapolis, Indiana.  She graduated from Lawrence Central High School in 1964.  She went back to school in 2002, earning an Associate Degree from the Community College of Vermont and then a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Johnson State College

In 1966 Sandy moved to Germany to be with her then-husband, Barry Eineman who was stationed in Babenhausen Germany with the Army.  There she gave birth to their daughter and they lived there for 3 years.  She loved her time spent in Germany.  She learned to speak some German and traveled all over Europe with her family and her parents when they came to visit.

In the summer of 1976 Sandy took a vacation with a friend to see the east coast of the United States, someplace she had never been.  When she arrived in Vermont, she decided she wanted to live here.  She went back to Indiana, packed up her kids and belongings and moved to Windsor Vt.

Sandy spent many happy years in Windsor, raising her children, hanging out with friends, and going on hikes with her beloved Golden Retriever, Dutch.   She spent many years working in Social Services. She spent several years working at the Vietnam Veterans Outreach Center.   She was always empathetic to people in need and wanted to do what she could to help. She spent 10 years working for SEVCA in White River Junction Vt.

Sandy loved to read, talk politics, travel, and be with her family. She was into genealogy and had traced her family roots back to when they arrived in the United States. She had a wonderful sense of humor, loved all animals, and rescued many. She was a hard worker who did a great job of raising her children. She will be missed greatly.

Sandy is survived by her brother Robert (Carolyn) E Thompson Jr, her daughter Mary Jo (Casey) Palmer and their sons, Reese and Chance, her son, Scott Eineman, partner Amanda Hensen, his daughters Michelle, Hunter, and Kennedy, Amanda’s children Rachel, Rileigh, Kenny and 4 great-grandchildren.  She was predeceased by Jacob, Amanda’s son.

A private family service will be held in October, her favorite time of year. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Lucy McKenzie Humane Society, West Windsor Vt 05089.

An online guestbook can be found at cabotfh.com.

David Norman DeSchamp Sr.

David Norman DeSchamp Sr. of Brownsville, VT, our beloved husband, father, and grandfather was carried home peacefully by Jesus while surrounded by his family on September 30th after enduring a long battle with Kennedy’s Disease. He was the oldest of five sons, born on April 14, 1942, to Walter and Thelma (Watson) and was raised in Quincy, Massachusetts. Dave contracted Polio in 1955 at the height of that epidemic and was hospitalized for six weeks. Despite being told to walk with canes, he put on his ice skates after discharge and went to hockey practice. He excelled in sports and loved playing baseball, hockey, bowling, swimming, water-skiing, tennis, and golf. He graduated from North Quincy High School in 1960 and continued many life-long friendships with his classmates. Following his graduation, he enlisted in the Army Reserves and attended boot camp for six months in Georgia; participating in training duties for many years. Upon completion of his military service, he graduated from Northeast Institute of Industrial Technology where he studied construction drafting and estimating. His first position at George A. Fuller Company on Beacon Hill in Boston was his most loved, and his career as a construction drafter and estimator continued until his retirement in 2000. In 1964, he married his true love, Kathleen Walbridge, and raised their 4 children in Scituate, MA, until October 1978 when they moved to Brownsville, VT. Dave was filled with pride for his four children and loved them dearly. He found great joy spending time with his grandchildren; especially watching them swim in the pond and play in the yard.

He is survived by his loving wife of 57 years, Kathleen (Walbridge), his 4 children all of Brownsville, VT: Kathleen Hall (Dennis), David Jr., Laura DeSchamp, Greg (Colleen) and his seven grandchildren: Dylan and Sarah DeSchamp, David and Harrison Hall and Olivia, Henry and Andrew DeSchamp. He is also survived by two brothers, Paul (Jean) of Summerfield, FL, and William (Katie) of Quincy, MA. He was predeceased by his parents and his brothers Wayne and Walter. He was the beloved brother-in-law of Joseph Walbridge (Gail) of Hanson, MA, Roy Walbridge of Celebration, FL, and Marie Walbridge of S. Weymouth, MA. He was pre-deceased by his brother-in-law Richard Walbridge (Dorothy) of Scituate, MA, and his sister-in-law Judith Stempleski (Patrick) of Norwell, MA. He was also a favorite uncle of many nieces and nephews.

Family and friends are invited to a Funeral Mass at St. Francis of Assisi Church, Windsor, Vermont, on Saturday, October 16, at 11 a.m., followed by a Celebration of Dave’s Life at the West Windsor Historical Society Grange Hall. (Due to COVID guidelines, masks will be required.) Arrangements are entrusted to Knight Funeral Home, Windsor, and online condolences are appreciated at www.knightfuneralhomes.com

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Kennedy’s Disease Association, P.O. Box 1105, Coarsegold, CA 93614-1105, kennedysdisease.org or to Bayada Hospice, 316 Main Street, P.O. Box 1590, Norwich, VT 05055, www.bayada.com

David Ludwig

April 16, 1945 – September 11, 2021

David Ludwig died peacefully, surrounded by his wife and children, on September 11, 2021. He was 76 years old.

David was born and raised in Indianapolis, Ind., where he lived with his parents, Ruth and Lyell, and his sister, Barbara. In 1964, he enrolled at Indiana University, graduating in 1968 with a Bachelor’s in Education. He would go on to study at St. Louis University, earning his Masters in Social Work in 1975. David spent his career serving others. He gave back to his community by serving on the Woodstock Elementary School Board as well as the board of the Ottauquechee Health Center. After retiring from social work, David stayed active by volunteering, helping proctor the New Jersey state bar exam, guiding visitors throughout the Washington Crossing Historic Park, and building theatrical sets.

David met his wife, Katherine, in 1966, while they were undergraduates at Indiana University. They married in August of 1970 and eventually settled in Woodstock, Vermont, where they would spend the next 25 years, raising their daughter, Sarah, and their son, Matthew. In 2001, they moved to Washington Crossing, Penn., where they lived for 21 years and found many more wonderful friends.

David was an intelligent man of many interests, experiences, and ideas. He instilled a love of the outdoors, camping, and fishing in his children. He was skilled in stagecraft–creating sets for Woodstock Union High School as well as local theatre troupes–and taught himself to craft historically accurate Revolutionary War cannons. David’s greatest passion as a builder, however, was clocks. Equally skilled in making and in restoring them, he was often called upon to fix “unfixable” clocks (and always found a way).

David was an avid reader: He especially loved Sherlock Holmes, Mark Twain, Charles Dickens, and history, particularly of the Civil and Revolutionary Wars. As a Revolutionary War reenactor, David crossed the Delaware River multiple times on Christmas Day, leading his crew through choppy waters, as Katherine watched through her fingers. He loved the Red Sox, the Phillies, and at some point, the Cardinals. But mostly he loved the Sox.

David played croquet in the backyard and cribbage with Katherine on camping trips, and taught both his children to play chess, with varying degrees of success. He and Katherine backpacked across Europe when they were first married, and took many road trips together throughout their lives. David loved to take photographs, especially of flowers, and was a collector of cameras and lenses. He collected many things, such as pewter, and clocks, and art, and books, and innumerable other objets d’art.

David was a friend to everyone he met. He talked to everyone, from bank tellers to wait staff to authors to the guy in line with him at Home Depot. He was a happy, helpful, extroverted, talkative soul. Phone calls with friends and family were always just as long as they were enjoyable.

Above all, David loved his family. He was a faithful and devoted husband to Katherine. They built their 51-year marriage on family traditions, adventures, and love, and they were each other’s best friends. David was incredibly proud of his children and their families. He collected the history of his children’s lives–their play programs, their notes, their drawings, their stories. He adored his three grandchildren and cherished every moment he spent with them.

When David received his cancer diagnosis, he fought hard to stay with his family for as long as he could. His constant optimism and strength allowed him to stay with his family for much longer than anyone could have thought possible.

David is survived by his beloved and devoted Kat; Sarah and her husband, Robin Searles; Matthew and his wife, Melissa Ludwig; and his grandchildren—John Ludwig and Evie and Conrad Searles. David also leaves behind his dear cousin, Peggy Irbe, his nephews and niece, Dan, Vince, and Leanne Larson, as well as many, many cherished friends.

The family wishes to express their profound gratitude for the many health care workers who cared for David throughout his illness. At David’s request, a memorial service will not be held, but the family encourages those who wish to celebrate David’s life to donate in his honor to the National Pancreatic Cancer Foundation at www.npcf.us.

Annual Appeal

In the final week of our Annual Appeal, we’re grateful and hopeful

By Dan Cotter, Vermont Standard publisher  

Like at most newspapers, times have been tough at the Standard.

­­­But unlike most newspapers, our situation doesn’t appear to be hopeless. In fact, it’s quite hopeful.

As I’ve chronicled in these pages in the past, the Standard now only generates about half as much revenue from the sale of advertising as it used to. In large part, that’s due to changes in the way people buy and sell things. Big box retailers and chain stores that don’t advertise in community newspapers attract most of the customers, which comes at the expense of smaller independent stores that tend to be the most loyal newspaper advertisers. And the rapid consumer shift today towards purchasing from Amazon and other online retailers has negatively impacted many local stores, and therefore local newspapers. When businesses struggle or cease to exist, they no longer advertise in the paper.

In addition, much of the classified advertising that used to be found in newspapers has now moved instead to online help-wanted, real estate and auto sales platforms. Plus, many local businesses now spend more of their marketing budgets on digital ads with giants like Google, Facebook and others.

The bottom line is that the math no longer adds up for the Standard to count on local advertising dollars alone to fund a quality news operation.

The hopeful part is that the Standard still has a very loyal, highly engaged audience that truly values the journalism we provide for the communities we serve. The Standard has not experienced the dramatic circulation decline that so many other newspapers around the country have endured, and our complementary audience on our news update website is substantial.

It’s gratifying, and no surprise then, that in the past few weeks so many of our readers have stepped up to offer well wishes and make a contribution to our 2021 Annual Appeal. Please accept our heartfelt thanks and our pledge to use your gifts wisely to fund the local journalism you deserve!

TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE  CLICK HERE

TO MAKE A GIFT TO THE VERMONT STANDARD ANNUAL APPEAL CLICK HERE

Your Annual Appeal gift supports not only our paper, but also our people

By Dan Cotter, publisher  

If ever there was an industry in which people are the product, it’s got to be newspapers.

Think about it. Each edition of a newspaper is essentially a compilation of the best efforts of a bunch of different people, all with complementary roles and responsibilities, who invested their time, talent, and creativity to produce their piece of a report that briefs you on the latest news in the community. Especially at a small paper like the Standard, there’s very little redundancy – everyone has a distinct job to do and they are counted upon to perform it to the best of their ability, under the pressure of deadlines, for a quality finished product to come together.

A community newspaper is sometimes referred to as “the weekly miracle,” because each week papers like the Standard start out with a blank page, and by deadline there’s a completely hand-crafted, finished local news report in your hands or available on your screen. It’s unique each week; full of content that is fresh and different from any of the earlier editions of the paper in its 168-year history.

Nearly all of the content in the Standard is reported, written and photographed from scratch by our own journalists and contributors.

Unlike most other media, we don’t simply pass along AP news stories or syndicated articles. We are the only news organization that is dedicated to serving our communities with original reporting about news that either happens here or directly affects the people who live here.

So, when you make a contribution to our 2021 Annual Appeal, you’re actually supporting the day-to-day efforts of a sizeable group of deeply committed individuals who collaborate every week to produce the Standard. Nearly 40 people, both paid and volunteers, play a role in keeping you informed about the news that affects you most – local news.

The people who produce the Standard are your neighbors. When you support the paper, you’re supporting them.

TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE  CLICK HERE

TO MAKE A GIFT TO THE VERMONT STANDARD ANNUAL APPEAL CLICK HERE

Today we’re asking all our friends to support local journalism

To Our Readers,

They say that old friends are the best friends.

Old friends have your back when the going gets tough. They help you carry on when you’re not strong.

After serving Woodstock and its surrounding towns for 168 years, you could say that the Standard and this community go way back. We hope we’ve made some friends along the way, and this month we’re leaning on our friends, both old and new, as we launch our first Annual Appeal fundraising effort.

We sincerely thank you for reading the Vermont Standard. Striving to produce a quality local news report that keeps you informed and engaged in our community is a critically important mission, and we’re quite honored to be entrusted with that assignment.

As we explained in the article that appeared in this space last week, we urgently need your support to help us bridge the gap between our declining advertising revenue and the expenses required to produce the local journalism that you need, want and deserve.

TO READ THE FULL LETTER CLICK HERE

TO MAKE A GIFT TO THE VERMONT STANDARD ANNUAL APPEAL CLICK HERE

Standard launches its first Annual Appeal

For 168 years, the town of Woodstock and its surrounding communities have relied upon the Vermont Standard to report the local news.

The paper’s mission each week has been to keep residents abreast of the latest happenings; let readers know what’s going on; give them something to talk about; tell them when someone is born or when someone dies, and everything in-between. We tell you who won, who lost; whether there’s reason to celebrate or to mourn; whether there is cause to be skeptical or reason to go all in; whether to be optimistic or cautious. Good news or bad, the Standard’s audience simply wants to know, “What’s new around here, what’s the latest?”

No other news media covers this particular slice of Vermont. Sure, regional news providers, such as TV stations, online sites, or daily papers from other towns, touch on our area and report some of the bigger stories that occur, but our communities aren’t their main focus or primary concern. At the Standard, though, our own communities are our only concern.

And the “little” stories are often just as important as the “big” ones to those who call this place home. Like we do.

We think ours is a noble mission. We’re proud to be entrusted to keep our communities informed and connected. We tell residents about local subjects that may interest them, affect them, entertain or inspire them. Independently owned, we work on behalf of the people, businesses and organizations of this area.

And readers look forward to the paper each week. Whether in print or digital, they read it, they trust it, and they have conversations with family and friends about the information they find in it.

That’s the way it was so many years ago when the Standard began and throughout all those decades since. That’s the way it remains to this very day.

Since 1853, the communities we serve have needed us. Right now, we need them.

Today the Standard is launching its first Annual Appeal.

TO READ THE FULL STORY CLICK HERE

TO MAKE A GIFT TO THE VERMONT STANDARD ANNUAL APPEAL CLICK HERE

Newspapers Are In a Race Against the Clock

Woodstock

Throughout the country newspapers are in a fight for their lives.          Here too.

Race Against The Clock VT Standard Front Page

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